About

Media Anthropology

Supports the study of indigenous media and their grounding in personal, social, cultural and ideological contexts, and how anthropological productions can be exhibited and used more effectively in classrooms, museums and television.

Visual Anthropology

Visual anthropologists examine how aspects of culture can be pictorially/visually interpreted and expressed, and how images can be understood as artifacts of culture. Historical photographs, in particular, are seen as a source of ethnographic data, expanding our horizons beyond the reach of memory culture.

Visual Anthropologists examine how aspects of culture can be pictorially/visually interpreted and expressed, and how images can be understood as artifacts of culture.
About

Media anthropology is an awareness of the interaction (both real and potential) between the various academic and applied aspects of anthropology and the multitude of media.

Anthropology's Tool Box

1. Eyes and Ears

2. Observation

3. Participation

4. Openness

5. And More

Story Telling

Things that seem irrational, scary, and downright weird on first arrival become second nature, and things that seemed natural and unquestionable at home can start to seem rather odd. Anthropologists believe that this position of being betwixt and between, or liminal, is a powerful place for understanding.

Visual Communication

Visual Anthropology combines anthropology with training in film-making and editing, visual methods, photography, sensory ethnography and sound.

Anthropology

Researchers live with and share the daily experiences of the people they are studying. They also conduct formal and informal interviews; carry out surveys; gather oral histories, myths, and genealogies; and take notes, film, and record. .

The Discipline

As a discipline, anthropology combines the rigor of science with the creative unexpectedness of art; it endeavors to evoke the real spirit, the true picture of human life in all its complexity, context, and contradiction.